Summary of the case statistical data for the first quarter of 2021

29 April 2021

In the first quarter of 2021, the security and labour provisions at the Constitutional Court remained in force, based on the restrictive measures imposed following the third wave of the coronavirus epidemic. On this basis, meetings of the panels are held online, while the Constitutional Court’s staff members work in general from home.

Tables with detailed case-statistical data as of 31 March 2021 are available here.

Between 1 January 2021 and 31 March 2021, a total of 148 new cases were referred to the rapporteur Justices of the Constitutional Court. The majority of these were constitutional complaints. In the same period in 2020, the number of new cases was 134.

A special category of cases is those brought on the basis of petitions against legislation or judicial decisions relating to the epidemics emergency. The current list of these cases is accessible here (in Hungarian).

In terms of completions, the bodies (plenary and panels) closed 159 cases between January and March 2021, of which 32 cases were decided on the merits. In 5 cases, judicial or administrative decisions were annulled, while 3 decisions annulled provisions of the law. The latter concerned 3 laws, 5 provisions of which were annulled by the Constitutional Court. The number of cases closed during the preparatory procedure before the Secretary General and by single judge rulings was 225.

Compared to the first quarter of 2020, the data show a clear increase – presumably because in March 2020, at the start of the first wave of the epidemic, the Constitutional Court’s panels did not meet for a few weeks before the online sessions started.

In the first quarter of 2021, 3 decisions annulling provisions of the law were taken by the bodies of the Constitutional Court. This concerned 3 laws, 5 provisions of which were annulled by the Constitutional Court.

On 31 March 2021, the Constitutional Court had 364 cases pending before it and allocated to rapporteur Justices of the Constitutional Court. Evidently, this number does not include the cases in which the preparatory procedure with the Secretary General was still ongoing on 31 March.

As there has been no significant decrease in the last year in the number of new cases opened, indeed, there has been a slight increase, the falling in the caseload figures shown in the table is due to a higher number of completions in the last year.